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Archive for September, 2010

New Blog

Paul Mather has started a blog on Image processing. Required reading I should think as he wrote the book on computer processing of RS images!

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IRCSET are offerign POSTDOC fellowships – deadline 27th Oct. More here

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According to Irish time Googles street view is to go live today.

Just checked and its not up yet (lost of nice panoramio pics – must think of use for them)

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Lectureship in Physical Oceanography/Ocean Remote Sensing
£27,319 to £43,840 per annum School of Ocean and Earth Science at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
See nature jobs for more detail

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Hyperspectral imaging is a powerful tool to collect spatial and spectroscopic data from food and other types of samples. It requires specialist techniques to extract the useful information from the complex images collected. Ireland already has a presence in this field. This conference, the second in the series, aims to bring together experts from many imaging fields from across the globe to share experiences and accelerate applications. See here

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From this years (the 8th) annual “Law and The Environment Conference in UCC comes this very interesting paper:

REMOTE SENSING – A TOOL FOR ENFORCING EU ENVIRONMENTAL LAW: GOOGLE, CORINE, LANDSAT, SPOT, GEOEYE AND LIDAR’ commissioned by the Friends of the Irish Environment

another useful report from the FOIE is EXISTING GEO-INFORMATICS IN THE REPUBLIC OF IRELAND by RORY G. SCARROTT

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Dr Ingrid Verstraeten (USGS) will deliver a Public Lecture on the science mission of the United States Geological Survey.

USGS SCIENCE ADDRESSING NATURAL RESOURCES CHALLENGES – A NEW DIRECTION

The Lecture will take place in the GSI Lecture Theatre, Beggars Bush, at 17.30 on Wednesday 22 September 2010.

All are welcome.

Dr. Ingrid Verstraeten started her career with the USGS in 1991 and currently is the Chief of USGS Programs in Europe, Russia, and Central Asia.  The post is assigned to the Office of the Director, International Programs, U. S. Geological Survey. Previously, she served as the Associate Chief of the USGS International Water Resources Branch, where she focused on water resources programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan as well as transboundary issues in Latin America.  She also worked on issues pertaining to the UN and UNESCO, providing technical assistance to the US Department of State in its formulation of water policy and managing programs funded by the US Agency for International Development, the US State Department, the National Academy of Sciences, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and the World Bank in the Middle East, Africa, South America, and Asia.  She has participated and led several S&T delegations and served as the USGS water resources Liaison with Department of Homeland Security in the past. She served as the US Focal Point, on the Joint International Isotopes in Hydrology Programme of UNESCO/IAEA, was the US Coordinator of the ISARM of the Americas Program, has been a member of the U.S. Interagency Working Group on UNESCO Science, a member of the US Interagency Working Group on Water, and a member of the US Interagency Working Group on the UN Commission on Sustainable Development.

Her degrees are in hydrogeology, geochemistry, geology, and soil science obtained from the University of Nebraska (PhD and MS) and the Catholic University of Leuven (Licenciaat and Kandidature), Belgium. She is a licensed Professional Geologist and Professional Soil Scientist.  Dr. Verstraeten is an active member of scientific organizations, participated on scientific review panels (US and EU), convened special sessions, and has been an associate editor. She has published numerous scientific peer-reviewed papers and book chapters.

Abstract:
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is realigning its management to further enhance the work of its science programs and their interdisciplinary focus areas related to the USGS Science Strategy.  In 2007, the USGS developed this science strategy outlining major natural-science issues facing the US and focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well being of the Nation and the world.  These areas include global climate change, water resources, natural hazards, energy and minerals, ecosystems, and data integration.  The development of a USGS Science Strategy for 2007–2017 came at a time of growing awareness of societal needs posing critical natural-science challenges: the emergence of a global economy affecting the demand for resources, the crystallization of ecosystem-based management, the need to understand climate change and its impacts, and the risks from natural hazards, all of which require a multi-disciplinary approach.  As the premier natural resources research bureau of the US Federal Government, the USGS plays an important role in helping the economy remain strong, the environment remain healthy, and the quality of life in the United States remain high.  To meet this responsibility more efficiently and effectively, the USGS is optimizing the integration of its traditional science disciplines. Major national issues of costly natural disasters, air and water quality, energy and materials needs, newly emerging diseases, invasive species, and climate change form a web of linked dependencies among environments, societies, and economies.  The USGS is transforming its approaches to problem solving, not only to address the issues of today, but also to prepare for those of tomorrow.  It has the breadth of earth and biological science expertise, the extensive national on-the-ground capability, and the wealth of biological, geographic, geologic, and hydrologic monitoring capabilities and existing data at all scales–from microscopic to global.  In the not-too-distant future, a scientist will access a comprehensive array of biological, geographic, geologic, and hydrologic data from past measurements and those being made in real time, use the data or models that describe the present state of the Nation, use scenarios of future climatic states to understand how the situation will change, and provide this information to decision makers and the broader public in forms most suited to their needs.  Moreover, the USGS is expanding its involvement in science diplomacy globally through science and technology exchange.

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