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A Teagasc Walsh Fellowship is available, deadline for applications is June 30th.

The 4 year structured PhD Fellowship is a joint research project between the Department of AgrifoodBusiness and Spatial Analysis, REDP, Teagasc (Ashtown), Maynooth University Department of Geography, Maynooth University, and the Department of Geography, University College Dublin. The student will be co-located between Teagasc Ashtown, Dublin and Maynooth University and will be registered at Maynooth University. The student will be working under the supervision of Rowan Fealy (MU) and Stuart Green (Teagasc).

The proposed research will establish a methodology for utilising rainfall radar, in combination with MetÉireann’s precipitation gauge network, to develop high spatio-temporal resolution, near real-time rainfall estimates for Ireland. An analysis of the rainfall radar will also be undertaken with available satellite data (eg. METEOSAT; Sentinel 1a/b). The results will provide a robust basis for developing real time,
local rainfall estimates that coupled with the Teagasc Nutrient Management Planning decision support system (NMP Online) can inform timing of fertiliser applications.

Full details here Walsh Fellowship PhD Advert Rainfall Radar May2017 (3)

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The latest round of EPA Ireland research funding calls have just been announced.

http://www.epa.ie/researchandeducation/research/epafunding/researchcall2017/

And there are two explicitly remote sensing calls under the water section:

Water 2017 Call – Project 4 Potential for the use of drones for the purposes of open lake water sampling €150,000
Water 2017 Call – Project 5 Remote sensing of surface waters in Ireland €250,000

 

I’d say there would also be RS elements to water projects 2 and 7.

 

Nothing obvious jumps out from the other two pillars- maybe a role for RS in the Climate call landuse project

 

 

 

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2 Post Doc positions in University College Cork

http://www.ucc.ie/en/hr/vacancies/research/full-details-648492-en.html

http://www.ucc.ie/en/hr/vacancies/research/full-details-648496-en.html

 

1 Post Doc position in NUI Galway

NUIG 020-16, Research FellowSatellite Remote Sensing Centre for Climate and Air Pollution Studies (C-CAPS), School of Physics, NUI Galway

 

  1. Teagasc PhD Walsh Fellowship Opportunity

“National farm scale estimates of grass yield using remote sensing”

Teagasc Walsh Fellowships, 2016 Ref: 2016051

Background

Grass, either as pasture or winter fodder, is the main feedstuff on Irish farms, therefore it is important to measure its growth rate and yield across Ireland (including with respect to soils and environmental conditions). Earth observation technologies are the only feasible way to give national estimates of grass yield for Ireland at a high spatial and temporal resolution.

 

This PhD will build on recent work done by the spatial analysis group in Teagasc and UCC on grassland monitoring through machine learning of optical satellite data. The original model, using advanced, data-rich algorithms for a limited number of sites to relate grass biomass to optically derived vegetation indices, was built using seasonal time series data from the MODIS sensor but insufficient ground data prevented extension of this work to a national scale. Additionally, national estimates of current grass growth conditions compared to decadal averages have been derived, again based on MODIS data, but the spatial resolution of this instrument compared to Irish field sizes has proven problematic.

 

The main goal of this PhD research is to combine these two approaches, drawing on high resolution data acquired by recently launched Landsat and ESA Sentinel-2 satellites, with a database of weekly grass growth rates on 300+ farms, to build a national model for farm scale (~1Ha resolution) frequent estimates of current grass biomass.

 

Requirements

Applicants should have a good primary degree (First or Upper Second Class Honours), and preferably an M.Sc. in an appropriate discipline (Remote Sensing, Agriculture, Computer Science, Physics, etc.). The successful candidate should be highly self-motivated and a good communicator in both oral and written format. Experience of computer programming would be an advantage.

Award

The PhD Fellowship is a joint research project between Teagasc, Ashtown, and the Department of Geography, University College Cork (UCC). The student will be based, in the first instance, at UCC working under the supervision of Dr. Fiona Cawkwell, followed by a move to Ashtown, Dublin under Teagasc supervisor Stuart Green. The Fellowship will start as soon as possible after 1st of October 2016 when the most suitable candidate is appointed.

The fellowship provides a stipend of €22,000. University fees are paid by the student from the stipend which is tenable for 4 years.

 

Further Information/Applications

Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland

Phone +353 (0)21 490 2707          email: f.cawkwell@ucc.ie

 

Stuart Green, REDP, Teagasc, Ashtown Research Centre, Ashtown, Dublin 15, Republic of Ireland

Phone +353 (0)1 805 9955            email: stuart.green@teagasc.ie

 

Application Procedure

Submit an electronic copy of Curriculum Vitae and a letter of interest simultaneously to:

Dr Fiona Cawkwell (f.cawkwell@ucc.ie) and Stuart Green (stuart.green@teagasc.ie)

 

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TEAGASC PHD WALSH FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY

“Assessing impact from extreme weather on agriculture & Irish farm resilience”

Ref 2015039

Background

As a changing climate will possibly be more variable and extreme, it is timely that we develop a better understanding of the impacts on agriculture and farm performance associated with extreme weather events and seasonal trends. Historically agro-meteorology has looked at climate and regional land-use, with less research on farm management and profitably. However, extreme weather events significantly affect farm productivity and profitability as well as influencing future management decisions. In order to increase farm resilience to extreme weather in Europe it is important to better understand the link between farm performance and weather events using Ireland as a case study.

This inter-institutional PhD project will analyse how weather influences farm performance. The project will draw on the new 30 year climate means generated by Met Eireann and a newly geo-referenced long-term farm survey by Teagasc to link farm performance to weather events. Questions on regional differences in coping with weather shocks will be examined. Inter- and intra-annual performance of grassland enterprises will be modelled in the context of local weather with the aim of producing quarterly forecast of agricultural performance. The project will contribute to advancing current agro-meteorological support tools provided by Met Eireann to include a benchmarking tool for Irish farming systems.

Requirements

Applicants should have a good primary degree (First or Second Class Honours) or M.Sc. in an appropriate discipline. Students with a background in Geography, Environmental Science, Statistics, Ag Science, Computing or Physics are particularly welcome.

It is important that the student can demonstrate good data handling and quantitative skills.

Applied interdisciplinary PhDs are opportunity for students to expand their experience into new areas so it is expected that the student will have willingness and ability to learn about other fields of study in particular meteorology, agriculture and GIS. The successful candidate should be highly self-motivated and have the ability to work with people across institutions.

Award

The PhD Fellowship is a joint research project between Teagasc and University College Dublin supported by Met Eireann. The student will be based at the Teagasc Research Centre at Ashtown, Co. Dublin and will be registered at the University College Dublin, working under the supervision of Dr. Tamara Hochstrasser in association with Teagasc supervisor (Stuart Green). The Fellowship will start on 1st May 2016.

The fellowship provides a stipend of €22,000. University fees (€6,550 for EU-residents and €13,100 for non-EU residents for the academic year 2015/16) are paid by the student from the stipend which is tenable for 4 years.

Further Information/Applications

Dr Stuart Green, Teagasc, Ashtown, Republic of Ireland email: stuart.green@teagasc.ie

Dr Tamara Hochstrasser, School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, D4, Republic of Ireland. Phone +353 (0)1 716 2440 email: tamara.hochstrasser@ucd.ie

Application Procedure

Submit an electronic copy of Curriculum Vitae (with a detailed breakdown of relevant educational achievement) and a letter of interest simultaneously to: Stuart Green (stuart.green@teagasc.ie) and Dr Tamara Hochstrasser (tamara.hochstrasser@ucd.ie).

Closing date

Review of applications will start on March 5th but suitable applicants are encouraged to contact us before this date. Details of the Teagasc Walsh fellowship programme (including terms and conditions) can be found at: http://www.teagasc.ie/research/postgrad/

WF Advert 2016

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Teagasc PhD Walsh Fellowship Opportunity
‘Precision agriculture tools and their application land drainage issues in Ireland’

Ref Walsh Fellowship Number: 2014017
Background
Artificial drainage is being revealed to be one of the most important barriers in the further development of sustainable agriculture across Ireland and Europe. The correct implementation and maintenance of drainage is important for the future economic and environmental viability of farming across much of the country. Correctly drained soils extend the grazing season in beef and dairy systems, thus increasing profitability and can improve nutrient management and yield.

This project has two parallel research goals: producing geographic data on the extent of heavy soils in the Border, Midland and Western (BMW) region that have likely been drained using remote sensing and geospatial models, and developing new tools using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as survey platforms to map intra-field drainage – both underground and over-ground flow.

Requirements
Applicants should have a good primary degree (First or Second Class Honours) or M.Sc. in an appropriate discipline (Computer Science, Environmental Science, Physical Sciences, etc.). The successful candidate should be highly self-motivated and be prepared for periods of field work with modern analytical equipment
Award
The PhD Fellowship is a joint research project between Teagasc, Oak Park, Carlow and the National Centre for Geocomputation, National University of Ireland Maynooth. The student will be based at the Teagasc Research Centre at Ashtown, Dublin and will be registered at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, working under the supervision of Dr. Tim McCarthy, Dr. Rowan Fealy and Dr. Conor Cahalane in association with Teagasc supervisors Mr. Stuart Green, Mr. Reamonn Fealy and Dr. Owen Fenton. The Fellowship will start on, or as soon as possible after, 1st of October when the most suitable candidate is appointed.
The fellowship award is €22,000 which includes a maintenance award to the student and payment of fees to NUI Maynooth for each of the 4 years tenable.

Further Information/Applications
Mr. Stuart Green, Teagasc Ashtown Research Centre, Scribblestown Road, Ashtown, Dublin 15.
Phone +353 (0)1 8459945​​email: Stuart.Green@teagasc.ie

Dr. Tim McCarthy, National Centre for Geocomputation, Iontas Building, National University of Ireland Maynooth,
Maynooth, Co. Kildare.
Phone +353 (1) 7086180​​email: Tim.McCarthy@nuim.ie

Application Procedure
Submit an electronic copy of Curriculum Vitae and a letter of interest simultaneously to:
Mr. Stuart Green (Stuart.Green@teagasc.ie) and
Dr. Tim McCarthy (Tim.McCarthy@nuim.ie).
Closing date
8th August, 2014.

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Somehwhat offf topic:

Teagasc 3 Year PhD Walsh Fellowship

€22,000 Per Annum

Sustainability and Consumers’ Use of Mobile Optical Recognition Systems in Food Related Search

Walsh Fellowship Number: 2014054

Background

The penetration of smartphones and iPads has risen rapidly over the past 18 months, reaching over 50% of the Irish population in 2013. These devices, sometimes referred to as optical recognition systems, possess mobile optical character recognition (OCR) capabilities enabling phone users to scan either Quick Recall codes (QR) or the package itself to link in to the company’s website or augmented reality (AR) applications. This presents food companies and the food industry in general with an opportunity to engage directly with consumers at the point of purchase or consumption. The project aims to develop a greater understanding of consumers’ usage of these devices to search for and access food related information thereby assisting companies and support agencies evaluate the strategic opportunities presented by these new technologies.

 

By adopting a mixed method approach to the research, this study will track and explain mobile OCR usage to engage with food products; it will identify the motivations underlying these engagements; it will assess the role of sustainability (across environmental, social, and economic dimensions) in encouraging search and engagement; and it will identify the potential to communicate the sustainability message using mobile OCR devices. Ultimately, it will inform key food company strategic decisions related to marketing, communication, packaging and brand development.

 

Requirements

Applicants should have or expect to have a good primary degree (First or Second Class Honours) or Masters in an appropriate discipline (e.g. Food Marketing, Agri-business, Marketing & Management, Commerce, Applied Psychology). The successful candidate should be highly self-motivated and be prepared to undertake fieldwork using a range of data collection techniques.

Award

This three year Teagasc Walsh Fellowship forms part of a joint research project between the Department of Agrifood Business and Spatial Analysis, Teagasc and the Department of Food Business and Development, University College Cork. The student will be based at the Teagasc Food Research Centre at Ashtown, Dublin 15 (under the supervision of Dr Maeve Henchion and Stuart Green) and will be registered at University College Cork (under the supervision of Dr Alan Collins, Dr Mary McCarthy and Dr Carol Kelleher). The Fellowship will start as soon as possible after 1st of October 2014 when the most suitable candidate is appointed. The fellowship provides an annual stipend of €22,000. University fees are deducted from the stipend which is tenable for 3 years.

Further Information/Applications

Dr Maeve Henchion, Dept. of Agrifood Business and Spatial Analysis, Teagasc, Food Research Centre, Ashtown, Dublin 15, Ireland

Phone: +353 (0)1 8059515                        email: maeve.henchion@teagasc.ie

Dr Alan Collins, Dept. Food Business and Development, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

Phone: +353 (0)21 490066                        email: a.collins@ucc.ie

 

Application Procedure

Submit an electronic copy of Curriculum Vitae and a letter of interest simultaneously to:

Dr Maeve Henchion (maeve.henchion@teagasc.ie) and

Dr Alan Collins (a.collins@ucc.ie).

Closing date Monday June 9th, 2014

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The call documents for the Horizon 2020 research calls are now hitting the public (http://ec.europa.eu/research/horizon2020/index_en.cfm?pg=h2020-documents)

Most of you will have seen these docs in draft forms over the last months but know they are out in the open.

Earth Observation and remote sensing is relevant across many of the themes and challenges  across the whole call – but for now lets look at the “hard core”.

Space is covered under “Industrial Leadership” and within that call there is a specific Earth Observation Sub- Call:

Call “Earth Observation” – 2014

EO 1 – 2014: New ideas for Earth-relevant space applications
Specific challenge:
…the Copernicus data, including the Contributing Missions (current and future), are expected to provide improved data quality, coverage and revisit times, and increase the value of Earth Observation data for scientific work and future emerging applications. Equally, space data obtained for specific purposes can subsequently reveal novel scientific insights which were not specifically intended or expected at the time of space sensor launch. …In this context space data (i.e.. remotely-sensed data as well as in-space located measurements, gravity data, magnetic data, GNSS signals) could be relevant to a wide variety of Earth-related topics (relevant to earth environment, atmosphere, agriculture, land use, risk, emergency management, security, cultural heritage and archaeology etc.), thereby widening the data scope beyond conventional EO images.

EO 2 – 2014: Climate Change relevant space-based Data reprocessing and calibration
Specific Challenge:
Research areas such as Climate Change address long time periods of data records, where historical data are essential to identify reliable trends and anomalies. The data from past remote sensing missions available either from European and non-European missions, must be made accessible in a way to establish seamless time series of similar observations, contributing to the generation of Climate Data Records across sensors and technologies over two decades and more. At the same time, the relevance of space derived variables and products needs to be critically examined, and enhanced to optimally fit the requirements arising from current policy issues in a variety of EU sectors. This includes the needs of assessment of impact of climate change, as well as mitigation and adaptation strategies in different societal benefit areas. This work is complementary to efforts undertaken by ESA in the Climate Change Initiative (CCI), and will require coordination with on-going efforts accordingly.

EO 3 – 2014: Observation capacity mapping in the context of Atmospheric and Climate change monitoring

Call “Earth Observation” – 2015

EO 1 – 2015: Bringing EO applications to the market
Specific challenge:
If space investments made in earth observation are to generate economic return, it is essential that EO products and information generation are taken out of the research environment and products are put into the market. Such EO products often realise highly automated processes with minimum manual intervention. For such applications and developments to succeed, the product needs to be shaped according to users’ demands, to be validated and proven. This needs to be achieved in an environment integrated at the user, in order for users to accept the innovative potential which the product promises. This will require also specific attention to be given to the various processes in place in the users’ workflows which incorporate the EO information. Furthermore, the commercial providers will have to prove that they can sustain their product operationally based on market revenues. To this end a credible planning for the 3 years after the end of public funding shall be part of the proposal.

EO 2 – 2015: Stimulating wider research use of Copernicus Sentinel Data
Specific challenge:
Europe’s investment in the Copernicus Sentinel satellites will provide Europe with an unprecedented source of operational satellite data. The first and largest streams of data will become available from Sentinel 1 (SAR data) during 2014, to be followed shortly thereafter with data from Sentinels 2 and 3 (optical imaging data), as well as Sentinel 5p. In the longer term also major contributions for atmospheric measurements will be made by Sentinels 4 and 5. Data streams are expected to amount to several terabyte per satellite orbit, thereby delivering unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution and data continuity, calling for new data handling and processing paradigms. While this data is ingested into the operational Copernicus services, wide use by the scientific community and industry researchers for developing products is still limited and needs to be stimulated with easy-to-use interfaces for performing R&D. Where appropriate, integration into operational services such as Copernicus may require the efficiency of highly automated processes with minimum manual intervention.

EO 3 – 2015: Technology developments for competitive imaging from space
Specific Challenge:
Observation concepts based on fractionated sensors (e.g. telescope arrays) have revolutionised astronomy, and their observation potential from space (swarm missions, satellite constellations…) has yet to be realised. This represents a departure from an approach of many different sensors residing on one satellite, in favour of many smaller single-sensor missions. It remains to be established for which areas of Earth observation (land monitoring, atmospheric measurements, water quality, maritime surveillance, emergency management, security, etc.) this approach might be particularly effective, be it in performance, risk management and cost effectiveness. Equally, it needs to be understood which technologies would be needed to allow a network/constellation to act as one instrument. Specific requirements for the sensors may also be needed to allow benefit to be taken of such mission concepts

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