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Archive for the ‘Remote Sensing in the popular media’ Category

Well not quite but Thompson Reuters has just released their top 3000 cited scientists globally.The Irish times article lists 11 scientists working Ireland and 2 of them we can claim for RS.

Colin O’Dowd in NUIG has been working with EO data in climate studies for years and is one of the driving forces behind the SFI EO center application, ACEObs.

And Colm O’Donnell is a world-class expert in hyperspectral sensing and Image Processing in food production.

 

 

 

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If you missed this morning’s piece on the Sentinel Launch tonight.

Its up on RTE Player:

http://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/10269544/

The sentinel bit starts in at about 1hr 5mins

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RTE will be covering the launch of the Sentinel Satellite tomorrow on “Morning Edition” @ 10.15 see me.

 

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Is it a sign that a technology is mainstream and mature when it’s allegedgly used for nefarious purposes?

http://thevane.gawker.com/fbi-probes-fema-after-allegations-of-flood-map-fixing-1553133243/all

 

 

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Ireland’s only science focused film festival opens on Thursday:

http://www.ucdscienceexpression.ie/

 

 

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The Science Squad programme shown on RTE 1, featuring me and Tim McCarthy of NUIM on remote sensing of grasslands can be found here on RTE Player

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With the recent fodder crisis and high agricultural industry growth targets set for 2020, growing the nation’s most important crop has become very serious business. Stuart Green, a remote sensing specialist at Teagasc’s Spatial Analysis Unit in Ashtown, tells presenter Kathriona Devereux how we are now using NASA and the ESA’s satellite technology to monitor grass growth using infra-red technology tonight on The Science Squad. It’s a research project that quite literally involves watching grass grow!

Using satellites to observe plant growth is a well developed technological service used across the globe, especially in tillage and horticulture. Measuring grass levels in a highly managed landscape like Ireland is much less developed.

Tonight on The Science Squad, Stuart Green describes the work that Teagasc, in collaboration with colleague Dr Fiona Cawkell in UCC, is doing in this area: “It’s hoped that within a short time we will be able to offer farmers estimates of current growing conditions, growth rate predictions and management advice such as when to turn out cattle from winter housing,” explains Stuart.

This sort of service is an example of precision agriculture: using technology to help farmers reduce inputs, manage their time and plan for the future.

“Focussing on grass and the delivery of plain, easily used, advice over the mobile phone means that the benefits of this technology will be available to all farmers regardless of size or system,” says Stuart.

The Science Squad will be broadcast on RTÉ 1 Friday October 4 at 7.30pm. See promotional video for tonight’s episode at: http://www.thesciencesquad.ie/episodes/series-2-episode-5/

 

Grass is an important resource, best measured at ground level but satellite can make good estimates of cover, explains Stuart Green, Teagasc to presenter Kathriona Devereux.

Grass is an important resource, best measured at ground level but satellite can make good estimates of cover, explains Stuart Green, Teagasc to presenter Kathriona Devereux.

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