Application is now open for ESA 8th Advanced Training Course on Land Remote Sensing

ESA is offering a five day training course at the University of Leicester, UK, from 10 – 14 September 2018. It is aimed at the post-graduate level, including Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, and users from Europe and Canada. Details and the application form are available here.

The application deadline is 8 June 2018.

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Map of the Month for February

This months map is completely different to last month– moving from national scale to farm scale.

This map is an intermediate output from one of our PhD students, Richa Marwaha. It shows current grass covers in Teagasc Moorepark as discerned by satellite. It shows how close we are to being to produce grass cover, biomass (Dry Matter) and management history form satellite. We’ve had a number of projects (along with projects in other Teagasc Centers) working in the area if mapping grass paddocks, some with handheld instruments, some with drones and some by satellite.

MOMFeb

 

 

 

 

 

 

U-flyte Drone Research centre

The Launch of Tim McCarthy’s (MU) SFI funded drone research centre out of Waterford got a lot of press yesterday.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/drone-research-project-could-help-swimmers-in-difficulty-1.3440516

http://www.engineersjournal.ie/2018/03/26/drone-technology-initiative-u-flyte-receives-e6-3m-research-boost/

It could be very important for Ireland and the devlopement of remote sensing tech and business on our cloudy Ireland.

 

 

 

New software for automatically detecting forest disturbance in Ireland

Short article on our new software that uses a 40 year archive of Landsat data to automatically detect forest disturbance in Ireland through comparison with new imagery ingested routinely

https://www.teagasc.ie/media/website/publications/2018/10-Automatic-detection-of-forest-disturbance-by-satellite.pdf

Off topic: Human and animal population in Ireland

Sort of linked to map of the month below, we were discussing farm animal numbers and the growth in the number of people in Ireland. A quick analysis of CSO numbers gives us the graph :

Popanimalhuman

and you can see a big peak in sheep numbers in early 90’s (due to “headage payments”) which are now back to “normal”. Cattle numbers don’t change that much- around 7 million. But the human population as nearly doubled form 2.8 to 4.8 million people since 1961.